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Magic School Bus Science Kit, Mold and Fungi

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Can I just say “Eeew”??! When I set off this year to do a better job helping my kids learn science at home after school, I didn’t know it would involve mold and dead rodents.

Actually, maybe I should blame this on Santa. He bought my daughter a subscription to the Magic School Bus Science Club  through a 50% off deal from Homeschool Buyers Co-op.

Here’s our latest kit:

Mold and Fungi

Mold and Fungi

This is the first kit we’ve gotten that is next to impossible to recreate at home. It came with a bunch of things I wouldn’t know where to buy: petri dishes, test tubes, Agar solution, etc. I guess you could find that on Amazon, but it would end up costing a lot more than $12.

Anyhow, here’s a look at some of the experiments we did:

This tray lived on my kitchen counter for almost two weeks.

This tray lived on my kitchen counter for almost two weeks.

After 2 hours, yeast blew up the balloon!

After 2 hours, yeast blew up the balloon!

Normal, dirty hands touch side A, Clean hands touch side B.

Normal, dirty hands touch side A, Clean hands touch side B.

A week later something is growing on the A side!

A week later something is growing on the A side!

Hard to see in the picture, but stuff is growing in this dish too. Yuck!

Hard to see in the picture, but stuff is growing in this dish too. Yuck!

The great news is my kids will hopefully have a better time remembering to use soap. 😉

For more posts about our Magic School Bus science kit adventures, click here.

 

Magic School Bus Science Kit, Magnets

Hide your infants!

Hide your infants!

Our latest Magic School Bus Science Club  purchased through the Homeschool Buyers Co-op was all about magnets. Thank goodness we don’t have any babies in the house because I’ve very paranoid about small childrend eating magnets. (I get worked up just thinking about it.)

But for a four-and-a-half year old, this kit was fun.

A lot of the experiments involved (included) iron filings, which wasn't as messy as it sounds.

A lot of the experiments involved iron filings, which wasn’t as messy as it sounds.

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Okay, this one was messy when big brother opened up the bag…

The classic "magnet on a car" experiment.

The classic “magnet on a car” experiment.

Making  a compass.

Making a compass.

The total time commitment for this kit was about thirty minutes. It required no unusual at-home materials and was really easy to teach.

But I must confess, I threw all of the magnets away in the trash when we were done. Just in case!

 

The Young Scientists Club, Kit 30

Kit 30 from the Young Scientists Club is about owl pellets.

Kit 30 from the Young Scientists Club is about owl pellets.

Our latest Young Scientists Club kit has come in the mail! Kit 30 came with an owl pellet to dissect. There were also some food-chain pictures to cut out, but the main event was looking through poop.

This activity can last between ten minutes to an hour, depending on interest.

This activity can last between ten minutes to an hour, depending on interest.

The dissection begins!

The dissection begins!

This owl ate a lot of critters!

This owl ate a lot of critters!

If you’re interested in doing owl pellet dissection at home, you can find materials on Amazon. We’re kicking around the idea of doing an owl dissection birthday party when Bruce turns 9. That’s how much he loved this!


Pkg (2) Owl Pellet Kit with Tweezers, Pointing Stick and 8-Page Booklet

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The real question is, how long to I have to have a dead rodent skeleton on my kitchen counter?