Teaching My Baby To Read

Home » Posts tagged 'Read Aloud'

Tag Archives: Read Aloud

What are the Three Types of Reading?

(This is a refresher, from an earlier post.)

Teachers know that there are three different types of reading: Independent Reading, Guided Reading, and Read Aloud.  Knowing the difference, helps teachers choose appropriate books for children that will continue to stretch their abilities and interests.  Teachers also know that it is important for children to be engaged in the three different types of reading every day.  This is contrary to the message popular culture keeps promoting “Read to your child!”  Reading to your child is of course essential, but that’s just hitting upon one type of reading.

Independent Reading, is when a child can sit down by himself and read a book.  For Jenna, this means sitting down by herself, paging through books, and looking at pictures.  For Bruce, it means staying up until 9:30 because he’s insisting on finishing Wayside School Gets a Little Stranger

Guided Reading is when you and your child are both engaged in reading a book together, and sharing your thinking and opinions as you go along.  Guided Reading may involve reading silently inside your head, or reading aloud.  When Bruce and I were reading the Little House on the Prairie series last summer, I’d often have him read the left hand pages, and I would read the right.  We’d talk about the story as it went along.  Jenna can’t really do Guided Reading yet, but she’s beginning to a little bit when I ask her to point out letters or pictures she can name in the books we read together.

Read Aloud is when the adult reads the book to the child.  This is what most parents do very well.  A few months ago my husband read The Hobbit to Bruce, and we read dozens of picture books to Jenna each day.  

When choosing books for your child you should remember Goldilocks and the Three Bears.  Read Aloud books should be too hard for your child to read on their own.  Independent Reading books should be too soft (meaning easy).  Guided Reading books should be just right.

MyFreeCopyright.com Registered & Protected

Artemis Fowl

Bruce read  J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Hobbit with my husband last month, and so it was my turn to do bedtime read aloud with Bruce.  Sometimes we let Bruce pick the book, but sometimes my husband or I choose as a way of introducing him to new material.  This time, I chose  Eoin Colfer’s Artemis Fowl, a book I had in my collection but had never read.  http://www.artemisfowl.com/

We are about 100 pages into it, and it is right up Bruce’s alley.  There’s magic, blaster weapons, an evil kid-genius master mind, and lot’s of spying.  There are also a lot superfluous references to Disneyland, attributed to the fact the publisher is owned by Disney, I think.  So far, the book is pretty entertaining, but nowhere nearly as good as Harry Potter.

The first night we were reading Bruce tried his usual trick of reading ahead several chapters by himself after he was supposed to go to bed, but the next night he asked me to go back and read from where he left off.  He said he didn’t really understand what was going on in the pages he read.  So today I looked up what Guided Reading Level Artemis Fowl is, and it is level Y, which means 6th grade.  No wonder it was too hard for the little guy!

Shakespeare For Children

Here’s one of our favorite books to read to Bruce.  We have several versions of Shakespeare for children, and this is one of the best because of its beautiful illustrations.  Bruce could probably read this on his own now, but we primary have used this book for read aloud, starting when he was four years old.

When it’s okay to point

Here’s an easy tip teachers know, that is easy to do during read aloud time.  Track the words with your finger!  It’s really simple, but sometimes hard to remember.  Tracking words with your finger is so important becauseit shows children that words on the page correspond to words that you read aloud.  It is critical towards teaching children to read.

When you hear (very real) stories about children teaching themselves to read without any parent input at extremely young ages like two or three, this is might be one of the explanations for why that happens.  Some parents just naturally track with their finger while they read, and some don’t.  I don’t track every single book I read to Jenna, because my hand would cramp up, but I do make sure to track at least a few books a day with her.

The Three Types of Reading

Teachers know that there are three different types of reading: Independent Reading, Guided Reading, and Read Aloud.

Knowing the difference, helps teachers choose appropriate books for children that will continue to stretch their abilities and interests.  Teachers also know that it is important for children to be engaged in the three different types of reading every day.  This is contrary to the message popular culture keeps promoting “Read to your child!”

Reading to your child is of course essential, but that’s just hitting upon one type of reading.

Independent Reading, is when a child can sit down by himself and read a book. 

For Jenna, this means sitting down by herself, paging through books, and looking at pictures.  For Bruce, it means staying up until 9:30 because he’s insisting on finishing Wayside School Gets a Little Stranger.

Guided Reading is when you and your child are both engaged in reading a book together, and sharing your thinking and opinions as you go along.

Guided Reading may involve reading silently inside your head, or reading aloud.  When Bruce and I were reading the Little House on the Prairie series last summer, I’d often have him read the left hand pages, and I would read the right.  We’d talk about the story as it went along.  Jenna can’t really do Guided Reading yet, but she’s beginning to a little bit when I ask her to point out letters or pictures she can name in the books we read together.

Read Aloud is when the adult reads the book to the child. 

This is what most parents do very well.  Right now my husband is reading The Hobbit to Bruce, and we read dozens of picture books to Jenna each day.

When choosing books for your child you should remember Goldilocks and the Three Bears:

Read Aloud books should be too hard for your child to read on their own.  Independent Reading books should be too soft (meaning easy).  Guided Reading books should be just right.