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Boys & Girls Learn Differently, Online Book Club: Chapter 2

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Are you reading Boys and Girls Learn Differently! A Guide for Teachers and Parents by Michael Gurian? If so, I’d LOVE to hear your thoughts on Chapter two. Please leave a comment or question below.

First, a brief one-sentence synopsis of what this books is about:

Once parents and teachers understand how male and female brains develop differently, they are better able to educate children.

My notes from Chapter two:

What does the most current research say about brain differences in girls and boys?

  • On average, boys do better on fast, multiple-choice tests because they tend to have stronger deductive reasoning skills (start with big picture, then look at details).
  • On average, girls do better with open ended questions because they tend to have stronger inductive reasoning skills (start with details, build up to big picture).
  • In general, boys do better than girls with abstract thinking. Girls will often have an easier time learning math if they have access to concrete manipulatives.
  • Girls often use language as they learn, boys are more likely to be learn silently.
  • Girls listen better and can still learn when a teacher is overly verbose or wanders. Boys need clear examples.
  • Boys are more likely to get bored.
  • Boys use more physical space.
  • Girls don’t usually need to move as much while they are learning.
  • Movement helps boys learn, which is why silent fidget toys are often helpful.
  • Girls often master cooperative groups earlier than boys.
  • There’s a section on page 48 about pecking orders. Girls can be at the bottom of a pecking order and still often get better grades than boys at the bottom of pecking orders.
  • There’s a section on pages 50-52 about Howard Gardner’s theory of Multiple Intelligences.
  • An interesting thought on page 53. Teachers often try to calm down young boys who are taking up a lot of space and being overtly physical (managing the spatial part of the brain to encourage linguistics). Maybe teacher should also be doing the opposite–encouraging girls to be more physical (managing the linguistic to encourage the spatial).
  • Pages 54-57 offer interesting data about the advantages for boys and challenges for girls in our school systems, as well as the opposite.

What are your thoughts on Chapter two?

 

Boys & Girls Learn Differently, Online Book Club

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Ready for some Mommy-Ed?

Right now I’m reading Boys and Girls Learn Differently! A Guide for Teachers and Parents by Michael Gurian and it is so fabulous that I want to tell everyone I know about it.

Here’s a one-sentence synopsis:

Once parents and teachers understand how male and female brains develop differently, they are better able to educate children.

I’m so impressed by Boys and Girls Learn Differently that I’m starting an online book club. If you’re interested in reading along with me, check out the book from your local library and stay tuned for future blog posts where you can add your own comments.

I’ve ordered my own personal copy from Amazon, but it won’t be here for two days. In the meantime I need to hide my highlighter. The copy I’m reading is from the library and I cannot contain myself from marking up important passages with a golf pencil.

Happily, on May 24, 2014 I’m attending the Helping Boys Thrive Summit in Edmonds, WA where I’ll get to hear Michael Gurian speak. I’ll be sure to blog about that as well.