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Monthly Archives: November 2014

“Bonhoeffer Abridged: Pastor, Martyr, Prophet, Spy” by Eric Metaxas


Bonhoeffer Abridged: Pastor, Martyr, Prophet, Spy by Eric Metaxas is a deeply thought-provoking look into the life of Dietrich Bonhoeffer. But it’s also more than that, because it tells the story of how Bonhoeffer’s entire family was effected by the tumultuous years between World War I and World War II. His father, Karl Bonhoeffer, was a famous psychiatrist and outspoken opponent of Freud. Dietrich’s twin sister, Sabine, married a man of Jewish decent and fled Germany to escape persecution. The Bonhoeffers were elite intellectuals, but neither money nor power was able to protect them from Hitler.

The heart of this book is how so many Germans risked and sometimes forfeited their lives to speak up against evil. Before I read Bonhoeffer Abridged, I did not know about the German Confessional Church which broke away from the National Church and objected to the Nazi regime. Bonhoeffer was a leader in this movement. As a spiritual thinker he was very ecumenical in nature. Bonhoeffer believed that Christians could benefit from spiritual practices from many denominations, including the Catholic church. I feel like he could preach at my United Methodist Church tomorrow, and fit right in.

As Hitler consolidated his power, the Bonhoeffer family was privy to information about SS atrocities that was still hidden from the rest of the world because there were so many Bonhoeffer relatives in high places. Dietrich was a committed pacifist, but as time wore on he joined the anti-Hitler resistance movement.

Tragically, Dietrich was killed at Flossenburg concentration camp, which my grandfather helped liberate two weeks later as part of the 741st Tank Battalion. So for me, this book had personal significance because I knew my grandpa was coming to help, but would not get there in time to save Dietrch’s life.

If you are at all interested in World War I or World War II history, you will love Bonhoeffer Abridged: Pastor, Martyr, Prophet, Spy. I received a free copy from BookLook in exchange for my honest opinion and review.

I review for BookSneeze®

 

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Exciting News!

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Dear Teaching My Baby to Read followers,

I’ve waited years to write this post. Today, Publishers Marketplace announced my two book deal with Georgia McBride at Month9Books. BLANK SLATE will release in 2016 and is about an 18 year-old girl whose lack of a virtual footprint makes her so valuable that she is auctioned off to the highest bidder. The sequel will come out in 2017.

Here’s the link to my brand new author page at Month9Books: http://month9booksblog.com/authors/jennifer-bardsley/, my new Facebook page: The YA Gal, and my new homepage: http://jenniferbardsley.net.

I’ve got so many people to thank that my acknowledgement page will be a mile long. But none of this would be possible without the incredible dedication of my literary agent, Liza Fleissig, of the Liza Royce Agency.

I've wanted to be an author since I was 11 years old.

I’ve wanted to be an author since I was 11 years old.

On this blog I’ve talked about the importance of empowering our kids to become resilient. This is a lesson I hope to teach my own children by example. Three blogs, five manuscripts, 100+ “I Brake for Moms” columns in The Everett Daily Herald; I’ve put in 10,000 hours of writing and my family knows what this dream has cost.

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But it’s worth it.

In 2016 there will be an author box in our family library with my name on it.

I hope when 2016 comes, you’re still with me. I hope you love my book and write glowing reviews on Amazon and Goodreads. I hope you tweet about it to all your friends!

In the meantime, my mission for Teaching My Baby to Read remains unchanged. My dream is to spark a national conversation about how massive parental involvement is the key to high quality education. Resiliency will make it happen.

Thank you from the bottom of my heart for your readership.

Jennifer Bardsley

 

 

Fifth Grade Math Triangle Challenge

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Here’s an especially tricky problem from 5th grade geometry. Everyone knows that the area of a triangle is 1/2 (b * h). But with this particular triangle, what qualifies as “the height” is difficult to see. At least it was for me the first time I looked at it.

I don’t know–maybe you’ll look at this problem and say “Duh, Jenny.” But for me, the scalene triangle was strange looking.

When I first looked at this I saw that it would be easy to solve with the Pythagorean Theorem. But Houghton Mifflin Math Expressions hadn’t covered that yet. So there was another even easier way to solve this problem that wasn’t jumping out to my me or my son.

Can you figure out what it is?

From Houghton Mifflin Math Expressions Grade 5 Chapter Two

From Houghton Mifflin Math Expressions Grade 5 Chapter Two

Figuring out the perimeter of the red triangle is easy. That’s 17 + 9 + 10 = 36 cm. But what about the area?

First, I’ll show the way that ends up being the most complicated: using the Pythagorean Theorem.

Using a squared + b squared = c squared, find out the area of the yellow triangle.

Using a squared + b squared = c squared, find out the area of the yellow triangle.

Now that you know b = 6, this lets you figure out that the length of the rectangle is 15 cm. That lets you figure out the area of the whole rectangle.

Now that you know b = 6, this lets you figure out that the length of the rectangle is 15 cm. That lets you figure out the area of the whole rectangle.

Using the Pythagorean Theorem to find the area of the yellow triangle.

Use the Pythagorean Theorem to find the area of the yellow triangle.

Then you figure out the area of the green triangle, and subtract green and yellow from the area of the rectangle, finally finding your answer.

Then you figure out the area of the green triangle, and subtract green and yellow from the area of the rectangle, finally find your answer.

This is a perfect example of how being algorithm dependent can screw up your number sense. I was so sure the Pythagorean Theorem was the way to go, I initially missed seeing the easier solution.

Another look at the original problem.

Another look at the original problem.

Okay, so everyone knows that the area of a triangle is 1/2 b * h. But with this particular triangle, that's tricky to see.

Triangles can always become parallelograms, which can be easier to deal with.

Now it's super easy to see that 8 cm = the height of the triangle, right?

Here’s the “Duh!” moment. Now it’s super easy to see that 8 cm = the height of the parallelogram which means it also = the height of the triangle.

1/2 the area of the parallelogram is the area of your triangle.

1/2 the area of the parallelogram is the area of your triangle.

Now after all of that, let’s look at the original problem and try a third method to solve this problem, using the formula 1/2 (b*h). This is arguably the easiest method.

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1/2 (9 * 8) = 36 sq cm.

Okay, so why didn’t I use the formula to begin with? When my son first looked at this, why didn’t I say “Dude, plug in the formula 1/2 (b * h),”?

Because that’s not what good math teachers do. Math is more than memorizing and applying formulas. Math is about experimenting, visualizing, internalizing and sometimes struggling until you reach a higher level of understanding.

This is an example of a problem that is simple yet confusing. Those are the best types! I’ve gone through college level calculus and I still looked at the picture and couldn’t viscerally understand why 8 cm was the height of the triangle. Neither could anyone in my family. (My husband, btw, is a lot smarter in math than me!)

So we played with this problem. We turned it inside out. Now, it makes sense. Along the way, we got to do a lot of cool math.