Teaching My Baby To Read

Home » Classical Education » The John Locke Experiment, SOTW III

The John Locke Experiment, SOTW III

A marshmallow, a chocolate chip, a raisin and a teaspoon of sugar.

A marshmallow, a chocolate chip, a raisin and a teaspoon of sugar.

Do you know what sweetness is?  Were you born knowing what sweetness is, or did you have to experience sweetness to understand?

That’s the question we were asking today as we learned about John Locke.

In case you were wondering, yes, this is another part of our summer adventure listening to Susan Wise Bauer’s The Story of the World: History for the Classical Child, Vol. 3: Early Modern Times, 2nd Edition (9 CDs).

  

(Btw, check out the SOTW Pinterest board I’m creating with Mrs. Warde from Sceleratus Classical Academy.)

The John Locke experiment comes from page 99 of The Story of the World Activity Book Three: Early Modern Times.  Parents read actual exerpts from John Locke’s An Essay Concerning Human Understanding, while kids eat the sweet stuff.

Then you have a discussion about how John Locke believed people were born as a “blank slate”, or “tabula rasa”.

As activities go, this one only took about five minutes.  But hey, how many 8-year-olds and 4-year-olds are out there learning about John Locke this summer?

You might even say that my kids were born blank slates with ultimate potential, but their mommy is turning them into nerds, one summer day at a time…


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow me on Twitter