My dream is to spark a national conversation

My dream is to spark a national conversation about how massive parental involvement is the key to high quality education.

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Attention Parents!

cropped-img_0934.jpgYou can teach your child a tremendous amount of academics, especially with some guidance.

My name is Jennifer Bardsley. Find out more about me here or here.

Where to Start  will give you ideas for toddlers and preschoolers, and Afterschooling is for Kindergarten on up. Every child deserves one-on-one instruction, and that experience can begin in your home.

My daughter’s breakthrough with “All About Reading”

Last Saturday my daughter ran around the house saying “Pinch me. Is this a dream? I can read!” It was the cutest thing ever, but it also broke my heart a little bit. Two months ago we realized “Jenna” needed glasses. Now, we’re still regrouping. One thing I know for sure is that Bob Books weren’t … Continue reading

How I realized my daughter needed glasses

This is a hard post to write without sounding like a Tiger Mom. My daughter “Jenna” is 5-and-a-half years-old and reads at Guided Reading level D, which is roughly 1st grade. She is witty, articulate, cheerful and loves to draw. Jenna has been immersed in language since she was a baby and learned her letters and … Continue reading

“You Have a Brain” by Ben Carson, MD


Chalk this down as one of the most unusual YA books I’ve read this year. “You Have a Brain: A Teen’s Guide to T.H.I.N.K. B.I.G.” is the memoir of pediatric neurosurgeon and presidential hopeful Ben Carson, co-written by Gregg Lewis and Deborah Shaw Lewis. It tells Ben Carson’s personal story of growing up on the streets of Detroit, being labeled a “dummy” by his peers, working hard at school and eventually attending Yale and the University of Michigan. He went on to become a famous neurosurgeon who performed ground breaking surgeries on conjoined twins.

What particularly interested me about this book was Ben Carson’s mother’s approach to “Afterschooling,” which is nearly identical to my own. For starters, Sonya Carson required her sons to read two books a week of their own choosing, and then write book reports that they read aloud. This push to read more, write more and think more, directly led to Ben and Curtis’ success.

I’m not sure what teen readers will think of “You Have a Brain: A Teen’s Guide to T.H.I.N.K. B.I.G.” It’s marketed to young adult readers, but is probably also serving as a tool to further Ben Carson’s political aspirations.

I gave aspirations too, primarily to spark a national conversation about how massive parental involvement is the key to high quality education. That’s the mission of my blog, “Teaching My Baby to Read.” For me the take home message of Ben Carson’s book was that without his mother Sonya overseeing her boys’ Afterschooling, their story might have been very different.

P.S. I received a free copy of this book from BookLook in exchange for my honest opinions and review.

I review for BookSneeze®

 

Parenting Poll: Let’s talk about reading!

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Reading Focus Cards

A month ago I purchased Reading Focus Cards to help support my daughter’s ability to track words. In the past, I’ve made homemade versions of the same idea for free (see how here), but I felt we were ready for an upgrade. The benefit of reading focus cards is that they come with different colored … Continue reading

Kindergarten Benchmark Sight Words

Here are the benchmark sight words my daughter’s Kindergarten class is expected to master by first grade: is a the has and of with see for no cannot have are said I you me come here to my look he go put want this she saw now like do home they went good was be … Continue reading

Five-year-olds can write nonfiction

Here’s a great idea from my daughter’s Kindergarten teacher: a lesson on informational writing. First she read the kids several “how-to” books and discussed the difference between fiction and nonfiction. Then she launched writer’s workshop. Directions: Give the kids three choices to write about. How to brush your teeth. How to plant a seed. How to make … Continue reading

“How Many Days Until Tomorrow?” by Caroline Janover


How Many Days Until Tomorrow? by Caroline Janover tells the story of two brothers who spend a rough summer living with their grandparents on an isolated island near Maine. Their grandmother is nice, but their grandfather is a real grump.

Simon is able to find escape in books, but Josh has dyslexia, and finds solace in nature instead. Luckily, Seal Island offers a myriad of creatures to examine. There’s everything from bald eagles, to a dead Minke whale that must be destroyed.

I really enjoyed reading How Many Days Until Tomorrow? a lot. The pace, plot, and character development were excellent. I also appreciated that it featured a main character with dyslexia. I would definitely read more from Janover in the future.

A book about Alzheimer’s for tween readers


Curveball: The Year I Lost My Grip, by Jordan Sonnenblick, is one of the funniest, sweetest books I’ve read all year. Yeah, it’s only February, but I bet if you ask me again in December I’ll say the same thing. If you know and love anyone with Alzheimer’s Disease, you’ve got to read this book!

The hook is that fourteen-year-old Peter is reinventing himself after a devastating baseball injury. His freshman year seems to hold promise after he teams up with a pretty girl named Angelika in photography. But at home, Peter watches his grandpa lose his memory bit by bit, and feels powerless to help.

I don’t know anything about photography so I can’t tell if those parts of the book were accurate or not, but the way the author portrayed Alzheimer’s Disease was spot on. It was perfect, absolutely perfect.

Thank you, Jordan, for writing this book, and thank you to Scholastic for publishing it.

“The Three Thorns” by Michael Gibney


“Dickens meets Tolkien for Kids.” That’s how I’d describe The Three Thorns (The Brotherhood and the Shield) by Michael Gibney. Three orphans are abandoned in Edwardian England, raised in wretched circumstances, and then happily reunited–only to discover the truth about their destiny.

It’s hard to talk about the plot of The Three Thorns without giving away major spoilers, but remember what I said earlier about Tokien? If you love trolls, goblins, magical creatures and battles, this book is for you! As soon as my nine-year-old read it he begged me to purchase the sequel, which will be published next year.

What I especially appreciated about The Three Thorns was the richness of location. I really felt like I was in 1912 London, or out in the countryside on a rabbit hunter’s estate. That made the contrast to the otherworldly scenes all the more sharp.

For more information about this series, check out http://www.thebrotherhoodandtheshield.com/.

“Still Life” by Christa Parrish

Still Life by Christa Parrish is a multi-view novel that bounces from the present to the past. Ada is a twenty-something woman who was raised in a cult and escapes when Pulitzer Prize winning photographer Julian feels called by God to marry her after a brief meeting. Katherine is a wife and mother of two teen boys who is having an affair. This is a story about broken people who deal with tragedy and bumble around being hurt and depressed.

I had high hopes for “Still Life because I loved “The Air We Breathe” and thought “Stones for Breads” was okay, but unfortunately, I had a hard time connecting with this book. My main problem was that most of the characters were so weak and pathetic that they were unlikable. The one really heroic character was Julian, who sounded too good to be true anyway. Julian’s best friend Hortense–who doesn’t have any hands–was a likable character, but she was part of the B-cast.

You know how in “Charlotte’s Web” the reader falls in love with Fern in the very first ten pages because of the “save the pig moment” when she rescues Wilbur? There was never a moment like that for me in “Still Life.” Why root for these people? In real life I’d have compassion for them because they were actual human beings, but as fictional characters they were simply annoying.

I still think Christa Parrish is an incredibly talented author based on “The Air We Breathe.” But “Still Life” did not do it for me at all.

P.S. I received a free copy of this book in exchange for my honest opinions and review.

I review for BookSneeze®

Every PTA in America should screen this film

Last night my husband and I watched The Big Picture: Rethinking Dyslexia a documentary that digs deep into dyslexia. What is dyslexia? Does it go away? Are there advantages to having a dyslexic brain? How can teachers and parents help? Unfortunately, like many teachers, I received very little training in how to help dyslexic children as … Continue reading

Realistic fiction for teens: “Muchacho” by Louanne Johnson

Muchacho by Louanne Johnson tells the story of self-proclaimed juvenile delinquent Eddie, who decides to change his ways after falling for Lupe, a college-bound beauty. This book takes place in New Mexico and is heavily laced with Spanish, slang, swear words and grit. It’s not your typical YA book, but could easily appear on a college reading list for a class on Chicano Literature–even though to my knowledge the author is white.

Johnson is also the author of the memoir My Posse Don’t Do Homework which was portrayed on screen as the movie “Dangerous Minds” with Michelle Pfeiffer. That book takes places in Northern California, whereas the movie version centers on Los Angeles.

This is a big deal to me personally, because I taught third grade in the Ravenswood School District in East Palo Alto–former murder capitol of America–which was the district that fed into the high school classrooms that Johnson based My Posse Don’t Do Homework on. I still don’t understand how Hollywood thinks Los Angeles is “scarier” than East Palo Alto. I had eight year olds drawing pictures of hiding from gangsters with guns.

In Muchacho, Johnson makes fun of white Stanford students (like me) who come to districts like Ravenswood. Although to be fair, it’s hard to tell if Johnson is making fun Stanford teachers or Eddie is. The Mr. McElroy character starts out a bit rough but ends up becoming a pretty good teacher (in my opinion at least).

Muchacho is not your typical YA book, but I enjoyed it a lot. It is a quick read, probably an under 50k word count, an is something that teenage boys would like too.

 

Why I want everyone I know on the Internet to Read “Faking Faith” by Josie Bloss


Faking Faithby Josie Bloss is like the website Homeschoolers Anonymous in novel form. It tells the story of a teenage girl from Chicago named Dylan who faces high school hell after a sexting incident. In her despair, Dylan becomes obsessed with fundamentalist homeschooled bloggers, and most especially a blogger named Abigail. After starting her own blog using the pseudonym “Faith”, Dylan is eventually invited to Abigail’s farm for a two-week vacation where she gets a whole new type of education.

Faking Faith never mentions the Advanced Training Institute by name, but ATI is written all over Abigail’s life. At seventeen and a half, her formal education is complete and she prepares for life as a professional “stay-at-home-daughter”, or else must submit to whatever husband her father chooses for her, whether that be the boy next door, or a creepy twenty-eight year old molester.

In addition to showing all the negatives, Bloss does an awesome job depicting the seductive nature of the ATI lifestyle. To Dylan as the outsider, she’s a bit jealous of Abigail’s family dinners, well-behaved siblings, and the fact that Abigail’s parents are concerned about guarding Abigail’s heart and making sure she doesn’t fall in love with the wrong person.

I loved Faking Faith so much that I read it start to finish in one day. Half way through my mind started churning with all the people who should know about this book: R.L. Stollar at Overturning Tables, Jerry at Hersey in the Heartland–the entire Recovering Grace community. If I was Josie Bloss’s publicist I would mail out a case of copies to Homeschoolers Anonymous and let them distribute at will.

Every time I turn on my computer it seems I see another news article about how “cute” and wonderful the Duggars are. Nobody mentions the dark side. A while back I wrote an article on my blog called: “What ordinary moms should know about the Bill Gothard Scandal.” Josie Bloss has shared that same information in novel form. Faking Faith is brilliant.

Fun book for beginning readers

Looking for a book that fits somewhere between Level 2 Book Books and Level 3? Check out Early Bird by Toni Yuly. This is a bright, cheerful story for beginning readers that my own daughter really enjoyed. We found this book at our local library.

A fun aspect about Early Bird is that in addition to the lovely illustrations, the text is presented in an interesting way, so that the words  “pop” out to kids. My daughter and I enjoyed  Early Bird  a lot, and can’t wait to see the author’s new book, Night Owl, which comes out in a few days.


 

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